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Selected Articles

From Brooklyn to Ballantyne: The Story Behind Charlotte's Affordable Housing Crisis

Charlotte’s history of affordable housing includes broken promises and empty gestures. Now that the city’s chronic shortage has become a crisis, leaders are responding with unprecedented resources. Will this time be different?

Charlotte Journalism Collaborative,  June 16, 2019

Finding Home: The Fight To Save Smithville

 

Residents of Cornelius’s Smithville neighborhood have endured segregation, sewage problems, civic neglect. Last year, when the state proposed a road through part of their community, few people – not even Smithville residents – would have predicted what would happen next.

WFAE, February 24, 2019

Why Charlotte (and Only Charlotte) Wants the 2020 RNC

 

A willingness to host such a big but unwanted event speaks to the ambition and insecurity that has long characterized North Carolina’s largest city.

CityLab, July 26, 2018.

A Revolution Is Happening in Davidson

 

Growth and political tension prompt residents to ask if the town needs saving.

Charlotte Magazine, June 21, 2018.

Old Anger and a Lost Neighborhood in Charlotte

 

The demise of Brooklyn—one of the nation’s oldest black neighborhoods before urban renewal—sheds light on the forces that have led to today’s city-wide anger. This article was written following Keith Lamont Scott's shooting death. 

CityLab, Oct. 11, 2016.

White people in Biddleville: The story of a changing neighborhood

A new desire for urban living is transforming Biddleville, Charlotte's oldest African-American neighborhood. Amid revitalization, there's worry that residents will be displaced and history lost. Gentrification has accelerated since this was published.

Charlotte Observer, March 18, 2016

Small pigs, fried Oreos, a sprawl of humanity

An exploration of globalism at the Barnyard Flea Market.

Charlotte Observer, June 27, 2014.

Mr. Merritt's Class

 

For the 2005-06 school year, Pam Kelley followed teacher Jeremiah Merritt and his fifth-graders in one of Charlotte's highest-poverty schools. The series won a first place in the national Missouri Lifestyle Journalism Awards. This link includes a selection of stories.

Charlotte Observer,  2005 - 2006